Link to Casual Relief Teachers twitter handle is: https://twitter.com/crtnetwork

Our twitter name is @crtnetwork



http://www.leadlearner.com/learntwitter/twitterbasics/

Part 1/5: The Basics of Twitter


Watch the 14 minute video below. Then complete the assignment #1.







TAKE TWITTER WITH YOU...Create account sign in this area
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TWITTER

Most educators who learn to use Twitter effectively say they learn
more from their personal learning network (PLN) on Twitter than
they’ve achieved from any other forms of professional development
or personal learning.
Unfortunately educators often dismiss Twitter, or fail to see the
value of Twitter, when they’re first introduced to Twitter.
Our aim of this post is to provide all the information you need to learn
how to use Twitter effectively as an educator.




Twitter No 1 in Top 100 tools for learning

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To access Tools Guideyou need to be a member for around $25 a year when you buy the "100 Top Learning Tools" material


PD for Teachers and Casual Relief Teachers Sovereign Hill


http://blogs.kqed.org/education/how-to-use-twitter-in-your-teaching-practice/?utm_content=buffercfe51&utm_source=buffer&utm_medium=twitter&utm_

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TWITTER FOR TEACHERS

Twitter2
Twitter2
….as opposed to Twitter for politicians, or celebrities, or sports stars etc. And there is a big difference because while you may have been turned off the whole idea of Twitter because of the scandals and rubbish you see on TV, it can be an amazing tool – both for your own learning as well as a useful teaching tool. 10 Ways to Learn From Twitter has some great ideas for how Twitter can be used personally including getting breaking news, using it as a search engine, getting instant advice and sharing content. According to 10 Reasons why Teachers use Twitter as a Professional Development Tool, teachers are using it to “...share and learn from each others expertise.” As for your students, get some ideas from 22 Effective Ways To Use Twitter In The Classroom which maps strategies and ideas against Bloom’s Taxonomy. You can’t get more kosher than that!
:-D
:-D

Marlene
Marlene

Marlene SA e-mentor



  • Twitter 5 tips and tricks




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TEN TEACHER TWITTER COMMANDMENTS


1. Join the conversation

Don’t be a perpetual “lurker”, jump right in and join theconversation. Others will value your contribution.

2. Think carefully

Think carefully before you tweet. The restriction of 140 characters obliges you to say exactly what you mean. And never, intentionally or otherwise, insult people who, mostly, you’ve never met face to face.

3. Give back

By all means ask your followers for help but it’s important to “give back.” Create worthwhile content and offer it, free of charge, to others. I spend perhaps two or three hours on Twitter each day but it is time well spent. As John Smith (@HoDTeacher) rightly says “…Twitter works best as a collaborative tool. The more you put in, the more you will get out of it.” You will find this insight and others in a recent post on Pragmatic Reform.

4. Join “Tweet Chats”

Join “Tweet Chats” on a regular basis. I personally have benefitted immensely from participating in #histedchat, a regular forum for History teachers.

5. Connect with Pre-Service Teachers

The classroom practitioners of the future are, in my experience, delighted to connect with the “veterans.”

6. Follow back

Follow back; after all, why would you want to limit the pool of expertise in your PLN. (I prefer to call it a “Personalized” Learning Network; after all, I control its composition.) Note: Typically, I do not immediately follow back educational businesses. If they are only interested in you as a possible customer, (and you fail to engage) they will soon “Unfollow” you.

7. Grow

Remember that Twitter is in actuality a micro-blogging platform. If you don’t “graduate” to a reflective, professionalblog, you should.

8. Never focus on how many

Most significantly, “Never focus on how many are following you. If you’re really here to learn you focus on who you follow… the voices you hear.” (A hat tip to the inspired and inspiring @RafranzDavis … If you don’t follow her, you must.)

9. Food photos

I really don’t want to see a photo of what you’re having for dinner. Unless, of course, I’m on the guest list.

10. The Twitter Song

This song deserves to become a viral, worldwide hit. Forget GangnamStyle, here (with apologies to Taylor Swift) is The Twitter Song. You should learn the lyrics.
- See more at: http://www.fractuslearning.com/2013/07/22/teacher-twitter-commandments/#sthash.Ays4WPsR.dpuf

TEN TEACHER TWITTER COMMANDMENTS


1. Join the conversation

Don’t be a perpetual “lurker”, jump right in and join theconversation. Others will value your contribution.

2. Think carefully

Think carefully before you tweet. The restriction of 140 characters obliges you to say exactly what you mean. And never, intentionally or otherwise, insult people who, mostly, you’ve never met face to face.

3. Give back

By all means ask your followers for help but it’s important to “give back.” Create worthwhile content and offer it, free of charge, to others. I spend perhaps two or three hours on Twitter each day but it is time well spent. As John Smith (@HoDTeacher) rightly says “…Twitter works best as a collaborative tool. The more you put in, the more you will get out of it.” You will find this insight and others in a recent post on Pragmatic Reform.

4. Join “Tweet Chats”

Join “Tweet Chats” on a regular basis. I personally have benefitted immensely from participating in #histedchat, a regular forum for History teachers.

5. Connect with Pre-Service Teachers

The classroom practitioners of the future are, in my experience, delighted to connect with the “veterans.”

6. Follow back

Follow back; after all, why would you want to limit the pool of expertise in your PLN. (I prefer to call it a “Personalized” Learning Network; after all, I control its composition.) Note: Typically, I do not immediately follow back educational businesses. If they are only interested in you as a possible customer, (and you fail to engage) they will soon “Unfollow” you.

7. Grow

Remember that Twitter is in actuality a micro-blogging platform. If you don’t “graduate” to a reflective, professionalblog, you should.

8. Never focus on how many

Most significantly, “Never focus on how many are following you. If you’re really here to learn you focus on who you follow… the voices you hear.” (A hat tip to the inspired and inspiring @RafranzDavis … If you don’t follow her, you must.)

9. Food photos

I really don’t want to see a photo of what you’re having for dinner. Unless, of course, I’m on the guest list.

10. The Twitter Song

This song deserves to become a viral, worldwide hit. Forget GangnamStyle, here (with apologies to Taylor Swift) is The Twitter Song. You should learn the lyrics.
- See more at: http://www.fractuslearning.com/2013/07/22/teacher-twitter-commandments/#sthash.Ays4WPsR.dpuf

TEN TEACHER TWITTER COMMANDMENTS


1. Join the conversation

Don’t be a perpetual “lurker”, jump right in and join theconversation. Others will value your contribution.

2. Think carefully

Think carefully before you tweet. The restriction of 140 characters obliges you to say exactly what you mean. And never, intentionally or otherwise, insult people who, mostly, you’ve never met face to face.

3. Give back

By all means ask your followers for help but it’s important to “give back.” Create worthwhile content and offer it, free of charge, to others. I spend perhaps two or three hours on Twitter each day but it is time well spent. As John Smith (@HoDTeacher) rightly says “…Twitter works best as a collaborative tool. The more you put in, the more you will get out of it.” You will find this insight and others in a recent post on Pragmatic Reform.

4. Join “Tweet Chats”

Join “Tweet Chats” on a regular basis. I personally have benefitted immensely from participating in #histedchat, a regular forum for History teachers.

5. Connect with Pre-Service Teachers

The classroom practitioners of the future are, in my experience, delighted to connect with the “veterans.”

6. Follow back

Follow back; after all, why would you want to limit the pool of expertise in your PLN. (I prefer to call it a “Personalized” Learning Network; after all, I control its composition.) Note: Typically, I do not immediately follow back educational businesses. If they are only interested in you as a possible customer, (and you fail to engage) they will soon “Unfollow” you.

7. Grow

Remember that Twitter is in actuality a micro-blogging platform. If you don’t “graduate” to a reflective, professionalblog, you should.

8. Never focus on how many

Most significantly, “Never focus on how many are following you. If you’re really here to learn you focus on who you follow… the voices you hear.” (A hat tip to the inspired and inspiring @RafranzDavis … If you don’t follow her, you must.)

9. Food photos

I really don’t want to see a photo of what you’re having for dinner. Unless, of course, I’m on the guest list.

10. The Twitter Song

This song deserves to become a viral, worldwide hit. Forget GangnamStyle, here (with apologies to Taylor Swift) is The Twitter Song. You should learn the lyrics.
- See more at: http://www.fractuslearning.com/2013/07/22/teacher-twitter-commandments/#sthash.Ays4WPsR.dpuf

TEN TEACHER TWITTER COMMANDMENTS


1. Join the conversation

Don’t be a perpetual “lurker”, jump right in and join theconversation. Others will value your contribution.

2. Think carefully

Think carefully before you tweet. The restriction of 140 characters obliges you to say exactly what you mean. And never, intentionally or otherwise, insult people who, mostly, you’ve never met face to face.

3. Give back

By all means ask your followers for help but it’s important to “give back.” Create worthwhile content and offer it, free of charge, to others. I spend perhaps two or three hours on Twitter each day but it is time well spent. As John Smith (@HoDTeacher) rightly says “…Twitter works best as a collaborative tool. The more you put in, the more you will get out of it.” You will find this insight and others in a recent post on Pragmatic Reform.

4. Join “Tweet Chats”

Join “Tweet Chats” on a regular basis. I personally have benefitted immensely from participating in #histedchat, a regular forum for History teachers.

5. Connect with Pre-Service Teachers

The classroom practitioners of the future are, in my experience, delighted to connect with the “veterans.”

6. Follow back

Follow back; after all, why would you want to limit the pool of expertise in your PLN. (I prefer to call it a “Personalized” Learning Network; after all, I control its composition.) Note: Typically, I do not immediately follow back educational businesses. If they are only interested in you as a possible customer, (and you fail to engage) they will soon “Unfollow” you.

7. Grow

Remember that Twitter is in actuality a micro-blogging platform. If you don’t “graduate” to a reflective, professionalblog, you should.

8. Never focus on how many

Most significantly, “Never focus on how many are following you. If you’re really here to learn you focus on who you follow… the voices you hear.” (A hat tip to the inspired and inspiring @RafranzDavis … If you don’t follow her, you must.)

9. Food photos

I really don’t want to see a photo of what you’re having for dinner. Unless, of course, I’m on the guest list.

10. The Twitter Song

This song deserves to become a viral, worldwide hit. Forget GangnamStyle, here (with apologies to Taylor Swift) is The Twitter Song. You should learn the lyrics.
- See more at: http://www.fractuslearning.com/2013/07/22/teacher-twitter-commandments/#sthash.Ays4WPsR.dpuf

10 Commandments




Guide Twitter Teachers

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